Images for Internet use

Written by Jeff Harrison
August 7, 2008
This post is a checklist/guideline for reducing the size of your images for use on the internet. This includes emailing images to others or putting them on a web site.
Images that are too large will take much longer to load, even with a hi-speed connection. They’ll also have interpolation artifacts from the browsers too, instead of presenting pixels to the viewer at 1:1.
A. Existing Image (from a camera for ex.) For Direct CorelDRAW exports, go to section B.
1. Open with Photo-PAINT.
2. Crop & color-correct the image.
3. I’ll often over-write the original at this point. Chances are huge that I’ll never need an uncropped, un color-corrected version of this image ever again. I want to save at this point since it preserves the remaining pixel dimensions of the original file (there’s no mushiness as the image hasn’t been up or downsampled). People say: Jeff, “storage is cheap”. I say, “Keep the originals if you want. I don’t want the originals after fixing them. That’s why I fixed them.” 🙂
4. Choose Image | Resample. For large images, keep the longest dimension at 800 pixels so that you understand what’s happening. Keep the aspect ratio/proportions.
5. Sharpen the image using Effects | Sharpen | Adaptive Unsharp. Try a setting of 50. This restores some detail that was lost during downsampling.
6. Export as a new file name to a location of your choice – but choose
the format based on colors in the file;
  •  If less than 256 colors, choose GIF (important: use optimized palette, Jarvis for dithering, intensity: full) Good for simple artwork, logos, lineart, cartoons…
  • If a photograph or more than 256 discreet colors, choose JPG. Check: Optimize Sub Format 4:4:4 Compression 10-20 Smoothing 0
You should now have an excellent file on disk that you can email or put onto a web page.

B. Export the artwork directly from CorelDRAW
1. Export as a new file name to a location of your choice. Choose the format based on colors in your CoreDRAW file:
  •  If less than 256 colors, choose GIF (important: use optimized palette, Jarvis for dithering, intensity: full) Good for simple artwork, logos, lineart, cartoons…
  • If a photograph or more than 256 discreet colors, choose JPG. Check: Optimize Sub Format 4:4:4 Compression 10-20 Smoothing 0
keep the longest dimension at 800 pixels so that you understand what’s happening for now. Keep the aspect ratio/proportions. You should now have an excellent file on disk that you can email or put onto a web page.

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Jeff Harrison

Jeff Harrison is a media "Jack-of-all-trades", familiar with most of the major media applications on the Windows platform. Whether it's 2D/print, 3D, audio, video, or web-related - he's working on mastering everything that comes his way. He's a past Alpha and Beta tester for Corel, and has instructed students from all over the world. He runs the popular MacroMonster.com site, the #1 place for CorelDRAW macros. Also check out his youtube page, and his gallery at coreldraw.com.

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